Mexican actress and beauty Felicia Mercado enjoy the roads and landscape of Central Park during her trip to New York City in the spring of 1977, shortly after she won Miss Mexico. Behind her, rises the huge 50-story white marble and glass General Motors Building (Emery Roth & Sons, 1968), and the Sherry-Netherland Hotel (Schultze & Weaver-Buchmann & Kahn, 1928) were visible on the left.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Activa Magazine. July 1977.

Aerial view of the new 59-story Citicorp Center (Hugh Stubbins-Emery Roth & Sons, 1977). Fall of 1977. View looking west,

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Architectural Record. February 1978.

Definitive architectural rendering for new 41-story Sperry & Hutchinson Building at 330 Madison Avenue in early 1962. Kahn & Jacobs, architects. George A. Fuller, contractor.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Architectural Record, November 1963.

Cleaning works on the famous Chrysler Building’s (William Van Allen, 1930) Art Decó Nirosta stainless steel crown. Early 1962.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Architectural Record. November 1967.

Worker cleaning the facade of the Empire State Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1931), 90 above the street level in September of 1962. On the background, at left, the new Pan Am Building (Walter Gropius-Emery Roth & Sons-Pietro Belluschi, 1963) under construction and the Chrysler Building (William Van Allen, 1930) are visible on the center.

Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times 

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September 1962: For the first time in 31 years, the Empire State Building received “a top-to-toe going over.” The job took five months and spanned all 102 stories. The crew members, 42 workers and 3 superintendents, were “the sort of men who do not bobble at heights.” This picture appeared in a photo spread with the caption: “Work on the base of the tower begins at dawn — and halts for the day before the first sightseers arrive at the observation deck on the 86th floor, just below here.”

Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times (via The Lively Morgue)

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Night view of Midtown Manhattan from the 70 floor observatory of RCA Building in Rockefeller Center, in the fall of 1972.

View looking south showing 500 Fifth Avenue tower (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1931), at left.

In the center of picture, the 102-story Empire State Building (Shreve; Lamb & Harmon, 1931) dominate the skyline with the new 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973-74) under construction are visible at background. The white skyscraper at foreground is the new 50-story W.R. Grace Building (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1973).

On the right, the building under construction is the new 1166 Avenue of the Americas (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1974) and above it are the new New York Telephone Building (Kahn & Jacobs, 1974) nearing completion, followed by 1133 Avenue of Americas (Emery Roth & Sons, 1969) and the new 57-story One Penn Plaza (Kahn & Jacobs, 1972) at background.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: “Gran Atlas Enciclopédico Aguilar. Vol. 9. Amnérica”. (Madrid, Spain, Ed. Aguilar, S.A. de Ediciones. 1979)

Aerial view of the 102-story Empire State Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1931) and its surrounding area in the Fall of 1972. View looking northwest showing some Midtown Manhattan late 1960s and early 1970s skyscrapers at backgroung.

Buildings from left are: 54-story crowned One Astor Plaza (Kahn & Jacobs, 1972), Uris Plaza (Emery Roth & Sons, 1972), New York Telephone (Kahn & Jacobs, 1974) under construction, and above it the 810 Seventh Avenue (Emery Roth & Sons, 1970).

Buildings at center, behind the Empire State’s tower is the steel skeleton of Rockefeller Center’s Celanesse Building (Harrison & Abramovitz, 1974) under construction, followed by the Center’s McGraw-Hill (Harrison & Abramovitz, 1972) and Exxon (Harrison & Abramovitz, 1971).

Skyscrapers at right are the W.R. Grace (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1973), Rockefeller Center’s RCA Building (Associated Architects, 1933), 500 Fifth Avenue (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1931) and above it, the new Solow Building (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1974) under construction.

Photo: James Doane.

Source: James Doane. “America an Aerial View” (Barcelona, Spain. Geocolor, S.A., 1978).

Aerial view of the new 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973-74) nearing completion on Fall of 1972. The old Barclay Vesey Building (Ralph Walker-McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin,1926) are visible on the left and the new 54-story U.S. Steel Building at One Liberty Plaza (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1972) are visible on the right.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: “Libro del Año 1976. Enciclopedia Salvat” (Barcelona, Spain, Salvat Editores, 1976).

Aerial view of Lower Manhattan’s Financial District skyscrapers in the fall of 1972. View looking northeast showing new late 1960s and early 1970s towers. In the clockwise order is the new 54-story U.S. Steel Building (One Liberty Plaza. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1972), Marine Midland (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1967), Irving Trust (Ralph Walker, 1931), One Chase Manhattan Bank Plaza (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1961), 40 Wall Street (Henry Craig Severance-Yasuo Matsui, 1930), City Bank Farmers Trust (Cross & Cross, 1931), 55 Water Street (Emery Roth & Sons, 1973), Two New York Plaza (Kahn & Jacobs, 1971), One New York Plaza (William Lescaze & Associates-Kahn & Jacobs, 1969), One State Street (Emery Roth & Sons, 1971), One Battery Park Plaza (Emery Roth & Sons, 1969) and Two Broadway Building (Emery Roth & Sons, 1959).

Photo: James Doane.

Source: James Doane. “America an Aerial View” (Barcelona, Spain. Geocolor, S.A., 1978).

Aerial view of Manhattan island in the Fall of 1972. View looking northeast showing the Financial Distric at foreground with the new 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973-74) nearing completion and the Battery Park City’s landfill. Midtown Manhattan skyscrapers are visible above, at left, and it is dominated by the Empire State Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1931). The Rockefeller Center and Pan Am Building are visibles. Above Midtown is Central Park.

Photo: Shostal Associates, New York.

Source: “Atlas Universal Planeta” (Barcelona, Spain. Editorial Planeta, 1980).